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Wyckoff Torpedoes Soccer Players Raise $1,200 For Breast Cancer Research

Wyckoff Torpedoes Soccer Players Raise $1,200 For Breast Cancer Research.
WYCKOFF, N.J. —Dozens of players from the Torpedoes Soccer Club recently raised more than $1,200 for breast cancer research and treatment.
Players on the club’s 35 teams purchased the pink socks and are wearing them during games this month, Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
The club raised $1,280, said Brian Weis, a club board member.
It is the second year the club has sold the socks; more than $2,000 was donated last year when the club sold 375 pairs of socks.
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Some of the Torpedoes Soccer Club presenting a ceremonial check for $1,280 to Gina Fernicola from Susan G. Komen.
— Photo courtesy of Brian Weis This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

Local woman wants to draw attention to metastatic breast cancer

So in an era when there’s so much focus on improvements in the early detection and treatment of breast cancer, and on the growing number of patients who survive, Laura Twomey feels she must draw attention to the toll breast cancer still claims. “It’s hard to get advocacy when everybody dies,” she said.
Twomey has metastatic — or Stage IV — breast cancer, for which there is no cure, only a life of constant treatments to try to stabilize the cancer for a while and give the patient a decent quality of life.
Although she has survived for 10 years, she’s aware that most metastatic breast cancer patients aren’t so lucky.
Twomey belongs to a Facebook group for metastatic breast cancer patients and their caregivers around the world.
“It’s hard to get advocacy when everybody dies,” she said.
Although most of the patients he treats have early stage cancer, Korytko said he’s seeing more patients with metastasized cancer, a sign that more of these patients are living longer.
Unlike Twomey, most patients with metastatic cancer were diagnosed before the cancer had spread.
She referred to the period between tests as “scanxiety.” How does Twomey live with 10 years of treatments and wondering when she’s going to die?
Twomey kept working until two years ago. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

A Pilot Study of a Brief Pre-Operative Intervention for Patients Undergoing Breast Surgery

Summary This study is to assess the feasibility of using a positive activities intervention, Positive Piggy Bank, in newly diagnosed women with breast cancer who will soon undergo surgery.
A randomized controlled pilot trial of a brief self-guided positive activities intervention, The Positive Piggy Bank (PPB), compared to Treatment as Usual.
At the end of the “deposit period,” in the case of this study after approximately 21 days, the participant “closes the account” and makes a full withdrawal by taking all of the slips out of the piggy bank and reading each one on the night before surgery.
Description Fifty participants will complete questionnaires at baseline (Day 1), then they will be randomized 1:1 to the Positive Piggy Bank condition (n=25) or Treatment as Usual (n = 25) approximately 3 weeks before surgery.
Post-intervention (Day of Surgery) and 14 days post-surgery, participants will complete the same questionnaires.
Intervention Procedures – The Positive Piggy Bank.
Many patients with ER-positive or PR-positive breast cancer usually are treated with endocrine therapy.
Only 700 metastatic breast cancer were registered in Official Cancer Reg… Letrozole in Preventing Cancer in Postmenopausal Women Who Have Received 4-6 Years of Hormone Therapy for Hormone Receptor-Positive, Lymph Node-Positive, Early-Stage Breast Cancer RATIONALE: Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells.
It is not yet known which regimen of l… Tamoxifen is the most widely used drug to treat women with estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast cancer.
The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab with chemotherapy is well established for women with higher risk human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

New Project Aims to Better Understand Metastatic Breast Cancer in Black Patients by Sampling DNA, Tumor Tissues

New Project Aims to Better Understand Metastatic Breast Cancer in Black Patients by Sampling DNA, Tumor Tissues.
Sheila Johnson-Glover (right) poses with another Metastatic Breast Cancer Project Participant.
But for some patients — specifically those whose cancer has metastasized, or spread to other parts of their bodies — the frilly ribbons and overall pink glory that comes with Breast Cancer Awareness Month is just too much.
Metastatic breast cancer survivor Sheila Johnson-Glover said the annual all-pink walks and such are nice for simply raising awareness about the disease.
“We’re aware of breast cancer.
“We leverage the power of the Broad Institute’s resources and the voice of the metastatic breast cancer community in order to focus cutting edge genomic science squarely on people living with metastatic breast cancer.” Researchers also analyze patients’ medical records, which helps them determine why some metastatic breast cancer treatments work in some patients but not in others.
Every so often, the MBCP provides patients with updates regarding its collective analysis of patient data, along with any breakthrough findings about the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.
Only 68 of the participants are African-American, which is why the MBCP is pouring more time and money into marketing the project to Black patients.
Glover said the key to grabbing the attention of Black patients is to market the project using MBCP participants who look like them.
But I think it’s gonna be big because this is patient-driven, which means that people have to listen.” Glover remains passionate about metastatic breast cancer advocacy efforts and said she hopes the MBCP will result in new findings about the invasive disease in African-Americans in the next few years. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

Most Recent


The Latest Developments in Breast Cancer Research

The Latest Developments in Breast Cancer Research.
October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and in honor of that, we are highlighting some of the latest breakthroughs in the cancer research all thanks to the many donations made throughout the world.
Breast cancer is important because it affects so many and scientists are constantly doing research to cure this disease.
Studies are examining factors such as weight, diet, and exercise in relation to how they influence breast cancer.
Furthermore, explorations of gene variations are examined to figure out if there are certain people who are more likely to get the disease.
Tamoxifen and raloxifene are two drugs that have already been approved to help reduce the severity of breast cancer, but there is still unease about any side effects.
Some studies have examined dietary supplements such as vitamins B6 and B12, omega 3 fatty acids, folate, and grapeseed extract to help once someone has been diagnosed with breast cancer.
However, for those who have already been diagnosed, Oncoplastic surgery is a procedure that’s available while the cancer is still in its early stages.
However, the side effects of the surgery are that the sizes and/or the shape of the breast may be altered.
It is great seeing how donations are furthering the treatment for breast cancer. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

Art Therapy Thursdays, Part 1: The Creative Block

Art Therapy Thursdays, Part 1: The Creative Block.
Have you ever tried to draw something and suddenly found yourself without inspiration?
If so, welcome to the club, and welcome to Sketchbook Skool’s Art Therapy Thursdays.
In the first of this new video series, Sketchbook Skool co-founder Koosje Koene admits that she has a problem: She’s in a creative rut.
Being a creative person, she’s tackling this problem in a creative way–by interviewing other artists, as well as writers and musicians, about how they’ve gotten over their artistic blocks.
In this video, you’ll meet someone close to Koosje’s heart–her husband Pascal, a musician; click here to listen to songs by his group Dirtroadmusicband!
(Fun SBS trivia: Some of the footage of Pascal’s band was filmed by Brian Leahy of Sparkling Eye Productions, a regular videographer for Sketchbook Skool’s European shoots.)
How did you deal with it?
Leave your answers in the comments below; Koosje, and the rest of us, could use them!
Koosje Koene is the co-founder of Sketchbook Skool, creator of Draw Tip Tuesday and her food illustration course Draw It Like It’s Hot, and a featured teacher in many other Sketchbook Skool kourses. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

Breast Cancer Stole My Sister: What I Want Us All To Remember

Breast Cancer Stole My Sister: What I Want Us All To Remember.
I’ve known loss in a personal way and because of that, I wake up each day to the reminder of just how short life is.
My sister died from metastatic breast cancer nine months ago.
And this beautiful fall month of October brings with it bittersweet memories as I am faced with the signs and slogans of breast cancer awareness facts staring me in the face everywhere I go.
I’m signed up to run in a 5k for breast cancer research at the end of this month.
I’d rather not feel an ache in my heart every time I see a tweet of a bald Shannen Doherty fighting her own breast cancer battle.
My sister also left us all behind.
Life comes and goes.
If I listen to the voice of grief, I will miss out on the living part of life.
I can hear her now telling me to put on my big girl panties and get over it cause there’s a whole lot of women out there who need to be reminded of what they’re fighting for. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

Austin woman diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer after birth of second child

Austin woman diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer after birth of second child.
Austin mother living 6 years with metastatic breast cancer (Photo: CBS Austin) Most parents cherish moments like watching their children play outside or learn to read.
But for Christina Duhon, those moments are on borrowed time.
The news was received right after Duhon delivered her second child.
Most metastatic breast cancer patients live just 2 to 3 years.
“That’s just devastating when you have a newborn and you’re like ‘I’m not even going to see this guy go to school or even walk and talk,’” Duhon said.
But numbers have not defined Duhon’s life.
“I’m in uncharted territory,” she said.
She is now going on 6 years living with metastatic breast cancer.
For now she’s counting her blessings, instead of counting the days. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

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Metastatic Breast Cancer
Education & Advocacy


Why More Black Women Than White Women Are Dying Of Breast Cancer — & How We Can Do Better

It’s a systemic issue.” She’s right, and the data backs her up: According to a new study released earlier this month by the Avon Foundation for Women, Black women are 43 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than white women.
“We suspect the disparity continues to grow primarily due to access to healthcare,” he says.
And for good reason: The five-year survival rate among women with breast cancer that hasn’t spread or metastasized is nearly 99 percent.
Hurlbert says that in some hospitals across the country, women can wait weeks, and even months, just to get a mammogram, which has a ripple effect, delaying surgery and treatment if both are needed.
Advertisement “If a woman comes in with a lump and has no insurance and needs to get into surgery after a biopsy, but learns that her hospital doesn’t have any open slots, a patient navigator can refer her to another local hospital.
Still, there’s more work to be done, especially for women whose cancer has reached stage IV and metastasized, meaning it has spread to other parts of the body.
Hurlbert says, “We don’t have specific data on what stage of breast cancer the women in the report had, but stage IV breast cancer is what kills.
Advocates such as Beth Caldwell, who was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer at 37 — years before she would have started routine mammograms — are lobbying to increase research funding.
“Roughly 40,000 Americans have been dying of metastatic breast cancer annually for several years now,” Caldwell pointed out.
What saves people’s lives is research.” Advertisement This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

Get the Latest Breast Cancer Resources in Spanish

Get the Latest Breast Cancer Resources in Spanish.
latina breast cancer pink Culture and language are two reasons many Latinas don’t always get timely and appropriate treatment for breast cancer.
Breast cancer is the No.
1 killer of Latinas.
The Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN) is hoping to alleviate some of the barriers to timely treatment through a series of informational materials in both English and Spanish.
The MBCN has created several informational resources for individuals coping with Stage IV breast cancer: “Being diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer can often be a frightening or overwhelming for many women,” according to the MBCN.
“This type of diagnosis can be especially difficult with those who don’t speak the language.” Materials can be downloaded or ordered as hard copies, and are available in English, too.
For more information, visit MBCN here. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

New Book: WAR OF THE HEART, BY JENNA VICTORIA

New Book: WAR OF THE HEART, BY JENNA VICTORIA.
As Louise relies on God; and on George for guidance, friendship then love, will the future George envisions strangle her own dreams?
Will their love survive generations of mistrust, the Blitz and being stranded in wartime 1940, possibly never to return to their former lives?
Jenna is the author of “fiction that feeds your faith” – Happily-Ever-After romance & romantic suspense stories with a Christian world view.
She also writes clean, wholesome romances.
Her stories emulate those she enjoys reading…with a heroine who is in grave danger & a hero who is smart enough to get out of her way as she kicks butt & takes down names… and those that feature the sweetest of fairy-tale-ending love stories.
She writes romances that glorify God and His sacrificial love through His Son, Jesus Christ and show how He gives us hope & peace amidst unbearable situations.
After her first breast cancer diagnosis in 2012, several reoccurrences and metastasis, Jenna continues to praise God and trust His oversight in her life; and continues to write more books.
Email: jenna@jennavictoria.com Website: http://www.jennavictoria.com Social Media Contacts Twitter Facebook www.facebook.com/jennavictoriaauthor/ Amazon Author Page https://www.amazon.com/author/jennavictoria/ Heroes of Song Personal Blog http://www.jennavictoria.com/category/blog-heroes-of-song/ Book Review Bloghttp://www.jennavictoria.com/category/on-jennas-shelf-reviews/ Instagram www.instagram.com/jenna_victoria_author/ Pinterest https://www.pint bearable situations.
After her first breast cancer diagnosis in 2012, several reoccurrences and metastasis, Jenna continues to praise God and trust His oversight in her life; and continues to write more books. This article was originally published at the “Article” source noted above and distributed by The Tutu Project for informational purposes only.

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